physiological and hypoalgesic effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation.

Cover of: physiological and hypoalgesic effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation. | Alice Fiona Louise Cramp

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Thesis (D.Phil.) - University of Ulster, 2000.

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Download physiological and hypoalgesic effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation.

Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is commonly used for the management of pain; however, its effects on several pain and function measures are unclear.

Objective The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of high-frequency TENS (HF-TENS) and low-frequency TENS (LF-TENS) on several outcome measures (pain at rest Cited by: Somers DL, Clemente FR. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation for the management of neuropathic pain: The effects of frequency and electrode position on prevention allodynia in a rat model of complex regional pain syndrome type II.

Phys Ther. ; –Cited by:   The effect of high- and low-frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation upon cutaneous blood flow and skin temperature in healthy Cited by: 3. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is a nonpharmacologic and noninvasive treatment commonly used by health care practitioners as an adjunct treatment for a variety of painful conditions.4, 12, 35 The most popular theory for the mechanism of action of TENS is the gate control theory of pain, 44 This theory proposes that stimulation of large-diameter afferent fibers Cited by:   Intervention group patients received transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation postoperatively five times for 30 minutes each.

Electrodes in control group patients were placed, but the device was not started. At each transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation session, the patients’ vital signs and pain severity were by: 1.

Effects of Burst-Type Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation on Cervical Range of Motion and Latent Myofascial Trigger Point Pain Sensitivity Author links open overlay panel Ángel L. Rodríguez-Fernández PT, MSc a Víctor Garrido-Santofimia PT a Javier Güeita-Rodríguez PT, MSc a b César Fernández-de-las-Peñas PT, MSc, PhD b.

To investigate whether transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) mitigates the spasticity of hemiplegic stroke patients, as assessed by electrophysiological variables, and the effects, if any, on the clinical appearance of spasticity.

[Subjects. The study investigated touch and pain sensations and the correlation between them in diadynamic current (DD) and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS), electrotherapies commonly applied in musculoskeletal disorders and occupational rehabilitation medicine.

Forty healthy subjects were treated with either DD (n=20) or TENS (n=20). Objective: To assess the comparative analgesic efficacy of H-wave therapy (HWT) and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) using a mechanical model of pain threshold measurement.

Study Design: Forty-eight healthy human volunteers (24 women, 24 men) were recruited and randomly assigned into one of six experimental groups; control, HWT (placebo, 2Hz, or 60Hz), or.

In a series of studies, Somers et al evaluated the physiological and analgesic effects of TENS in rats with a chronic nerve-constriction injury, which is a model for neuropathic pain– They showed that daily conventional TENS on the same side as the nerve injury reduced bilateral dorsal horn content of aspartate and glutamate compared to.

Objective: To investigate the hypoalgesic effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) upon low back pain (LBP) in people with multiple sclerosis (MS). Design: A randomized double-blind placebo controlled clinical pilot study. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) was applied during visit 2 and remained turned on for 30 minutes prior to reassessment of pain, fatigue, and function.

Participants were given the TENS unit for home use over a 4‐week period before returning for visit 3. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is an electrotherapeutic procedure used for pain control that has been examined in the medical literature since its introduction by Wall and Sweet in 1 It has come under much scrutiny lately with the Center for Medicare Services rendering a recent decision stating that “TENS is not reasonable and necessary for the treatment of.

Walsh DM, Liggett C, Baxter D, Allen JM. A double-blind investigation of the hypoalgesic effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation upon experimentally induced ischaemic pain.

Pain. ; Google Scholar. To determine the hypoalgesic effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) parameter combinations on experimental models in healthy humans. Methods Searches were performed using the electronic databases Ovid MEDLINE, CINAHL, AMED, and Web of Science (from inception to December ).

Percutaneous electrical nerve stimulation is a novel, nonpharmacologic analgesic therapy that combines the advantages of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (i.e., peripheral dermatomal-based electrical nerve stimulation) and electroacupuncture (i.e., electrical stimulation at specific acupoints via percutaneously placed needles).

Lone, A. R., et al. "Analgesic efficacy of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation compared with diclofenac sodium in osteo-arthritis of the knee." Physiotherapy 89(8): Miller, L., et al. "The effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on spasticity." Physical.

BACKGROUND Electrical stimulation of peripheral nerves produces acute analgesic effects. This randomized, sham-controlled, crossover study was designed to evaluate the effect of differing durations of electrical stimulation on the analgesic response to percutaneous electrical nerve stimulation in 75 consenting patients with low back pain.

Journal article views. A controlled study on the effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and interferential therapy upon the RIII nociceptive and H-reflexes in humans / Gareth, Noble.

Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Volume: 81, Issue: 3, Pages: - nting with chronic LBP were recruited and randomized into 3 groups (n=30 per group): (1) low-frequency TENS group (4 Hz, μs); (2) high-frequency TENS group ( Hz, μs); and (3) placebo TENS.

Participants self-applied TENS for 45 minutes, a minimum of twice daily, for 6 weeks. Outcome measures were recorded at weeks 1, 6, 10, and Primary outcome measures included: Visual Analog. Objective This study was designed to investigate the hypoalgesic effects of self-applied transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) on chronic low-back pain (LBP) in a multiple sclerosis (MS) population.

Methods Ninety participants with probable or definite MS (aged 21 to 78 y) presenting with chronic LBP were recruited and randomized into 3 groups (n=30 per group): (1) low. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is a technique that delivers mild electrical currents across the intact surface of the skin to reduce pain.

TENS is used by practitioners throughout the world to manage painful conditions and TENS equipment can be purchased by the general public so that they can self-administer treatment. There are thousands of experimental and clinical. A pilot investigation of the hypoalgesic effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation upon low back pain in people with multiple sclerosis.

Clin Rehabil ; – Forst T, Nguyen M, Forst S, Disselhoff B, Pohlmann T, Pfutzner A. Impact of low frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on symptomatic diabetic.

•Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS)(1) –Electrical stimulation is delivered through electrodes placed on the skin –Units can be powered by batteries to allow for ease of use during functional tasks –Most often used in an effort to reduce/eliminate pain •“Standard” TENS devices(1) –Administer biphasic pulsed currents.

Objective: To investigate the hypoalgesic effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) upon low back pain (LBP) in people with multiple sclerosis (MS).

Design: A randomized double-blind placebo controlled clinical pilot study. Subjects and setting: Fifteen people with MS were recruited and randomly allocated to one of the following groups under double blind conditions (n = 5. * Clinical Research Fellow. † Professor and McDermott Chair of Anesthesiology.

TRANSCUTANEOUS electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) at both Chinese acupoints and dermatomal levels corresponding to the surgical incision have been reported to significantly decrease postoperative opioid requirements and the incidence of opioid-related side effects.

1–4 The effectiveness of TENS in. Transcutaneous electrical stimulation (TES) has been advocated as an adjunctive modality to enhance outcomes in exercise‐based therapy for individuals with dysphagia. However, significant variation in how TES is applied during therapy remains and the physiological swallowing response to TES is poorly studied, especially in older adults.

Similar Items. A pilot investigation of the hypoalgesic effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation upon low back pain in people with multiple sclerosis by: Gareth, Noble Published: () ; A controlled study on the effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and interferential therapy upon the RIII nociceptive and H-reflexes in humans by: Gareth, Noble Published: ().

The aim of the current study, for which ethical approval was obtained, was to assess the hypoalgesic efficacy of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) upon acute stage (72 h) experimentally induced delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS) and Cervical Joint Manipulation (CJM) are often used for pain treatment.

TENS also promotes analgesia by activating a descending pathway, which originates in the periaqueductal grey (PAG) and in the rostroventromedial medulla (RVM) to inhibit the excitability of nociceptive neurons in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. The hypoalgesic effect of transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) is well known for many years, but effectiveness during postoperative period is still controversial and maybe therefore didn't come to daily practice.

However it could be a promising part of multi-modal pain treatment for hernia patients. Physical Therapy, Vol Issue 3, 1 MarchTranscutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and TENS-like devices such as IFC have been used in the symptomatic management of ischemic pain.

19 A double-blind investigation of the hypoalgesic effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation upon experimentally induced ischaemic pain. Various forms of ‘medium frequency’ (kHz range) electrical stimulation have been advocated for motor stimulation effects, and more recently, for hypoalgesia.

Russian Stimulation (at Hz or kHz) has been shown to be effective in increasing muscle strength and torque generation. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is often used as additional pain treatment. However, recent studies show inconsistent results. We aimed to assess the effect of micro-TENS in reducing neuropathic pain in patients with PDN in a placebo-controlled, single-blinded, and.

The hypoalgesic effect of remote tactile sensory modulation on the mechanical sensitivity of trigger points Posted on Octo by William Harrison It is possible to inhibit the sensitivity of the myofascial trigger point (MTrP) by electrical stimulation of remote site. The article discusses the use of electrical stimulation and integrated nerve block in the treatment of diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

Peripheral neuropathy can cause diabetic patients significant pain and the use of an electro-analgesic device (EAD) with chemical nerve blocks such as local anesthetics can help repair damaged nerve tissue, cause vasodilation and provide substantial pain relief.

Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation _____ What is it. It is a form of electrical stimulation with surface electrodes to modulate pain perception. Why do physical therapist use it. § To reduce pain perception § To reduce spasticity § To reduce nausea and vomiting (cancer patients or post-op) What stages of healing can we use TENS.

Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS) is an electrophysical modality used for pain management. This study investigated the dose response of different TENS intensities on experimentally induced pressure pain. One hundred and thirty TENS naive healthy individuals ( years old; 65 males, 65 females) were randomly allocated to 5 groups (n = 26 per group): Strong Non Painful TENS.

The effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on strength, proprioception, balance and mobility in people with stroke: a randomized controlled cross-over trial Show all authors Sarah F Tyson 1. Objectives: To compare the hypoalgesic effects of conventional transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) (high frequency, low intensity) and acupuncture-like.

The effects of transcutaneous electrical stimulation during wakefulness and sleep in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. Am Rev Respir Dis –, Crossref | ISI Google Scholar; 6. Eikermann M, Jordan AS, Chamberlin NL, Gautam S, Wellman A, Lo YL, White DP, Malhotra A. The influence of aging on pharyngeal collapsibility.C.

Chen and M. I. Johnson, “An investigation into the hypoalgesic effects of high- and low-frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) on experimentally-induced blunt pressure pain in healthy human participants,” The Journal of Pain, vol.

11. The effect of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on blood pressure Msc. Cinara Stein Physical Therapy Department, Universidade Federal de Ciências da Saúde de Porto Alegre (UFCSPA) and University Foundation of Cardiology, Institute of Cardiology of Rio Grande do Sul (IC/FUC), Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil & Scd.

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